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20130107
20130115
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
's about if you are immediately engaged in the work environment together, it's allowing for more opportunities selling someone to take on a new project or allowing someone to maybe how could i say flesh out ideas and actually put them in place and then learned from that because not everything is going to be perfect. but knowing that even if it doesn't come out right someone is going to say it's okay. it's okay. we are we to work on getting a better. i think that's where he learned the most about leadership and about how to conduct perfect but it is you want to do. men do it with men and with women, too to read these relationships are always down for women and we shouldn't be ashamed of that. >> we ask you what you were watching when you were 17 that would have made this a little bit easier and you said keep striving. never lose heart. it's not about how much time you get knocked down but it's about how many times you get back up and it's what you do after you get back up and brush yourself off that really matters. i just wondered if there was any specific time you could talk abou
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
and your observations on that nexus between the environment and the economy, and then i want to come to gayle, switching gears entirely, and going back to the state park concept you mentioned in your opening remark, so, frank? >> thank you, lynn. we did travel to brazil together. i've never seen a more energetic herder than lynn. [laughter] she recognizedded most of the things we saw, including some i think you have never seen before. it's important to know why we went to brazil and what that tells us about the subject we are talking about today. we went there because we wanted to find out how brazil was doing in its effort to reduce the deep forrestation that was taking place in the amazon. is the first thing we did once we got there was go to a slaughter house. we looked at each other and said, we didn't sign up for that. what's that have to do with deforestation? turns out brazil's effort to reduce deforestization was to enact a law that required certain land owners, many land owners, to take a certain part of their land, a fraction of their land and keep that in natural state, me
security environment and the nation's fiscal challenges as well. we will adjust and compromise as necessary but we will need broad consensus with congress on the way forward to avoid a hollow military. this must be our priority. nevertheless, despite enduring challenges i'm pleased to note that air force has made progress in many areas and can point to a number of accomplishments -- accomplishments during the past calendar year. it worked for the active component and reserve component force structure challenges that were part of the fy13 residents budget proposal to produce a compromise which congress passed on freezing previously approved force structure changes. we confronted the problem of sexual assaults and unprofessional relationships that basic military training and have convicted defenders. we are strengthening our sexual assault prevention efforts and recent initiatives include the air force wide health and welfare inspection and the establishment of the special victims counsel program. with regard to space launch, the air force completed nine secession will space launch campaigns
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
regulated environment. so we take you quickly through a few studies that we've done that i think shows some very consistent patterns with firearms selzer accountability measures and the diversion of guns to criminals. the first one we published in 2009 was a study where we took the atf data from the 54 cities that had done comprehensive trace practices, had been in place in those cities. we looked at the state gun laws and we did a survey of state and local agencies to see what practices they engaged with respect to the oversight of licensed gun dealers and we did some regression analysis we control for a number of factors including other state done laws, gun ownership proxy's and the proximity to other states with weak gun laws. what we found is when you just looked at the states having strong gun dealer registrations by itself, it actually did not affect the diversion of guns to criminals. it was only having those in concert with a practicing those agencies of regulatory audit inspections and oversight of the dealers which i think it's quite interesting and important. we also found states
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)